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CAPE takes "Not in My Squad" to Maine ARNG

Sgt. Maj. Boris Bolaños, senior enlisted advisor to the Center for the Army Profession and Ethic, took a "Not in My Squad" workshop to more than 50 noncommissioned officers (NCOs) from the Maine Army National Guard in Bangor, Maine, in early February.

"The program is based on building trust, which struck a chord with me," said Maine National Guard Command Sgt. Maj. Scott Doyon. "I make it a priority to go out and visit all of our units and talk to as many Soldiers as I can. What I have realized is that the communication that we used to have is missing, and that's what made me reach out to the NIMS staff."

Read the full article: "Not in My Squad" Training Comes to Maine

2016 Army Profession Forum

Army leaders from across the force met last week for the Army Profession Forum, hosted by the Secretary of the Army and the Chief of Staff of the Army (CSA) and facilitated by the Center for the Army Profession and Ethic (CAPE).

The objectives of the forum were to introduce the FY 17/18 America's Army - Our Profession "One Army, Indivisible" theme, introduce the Army Character Development Project and the way ahead, and enhance Trust in the Total Army.

During the forum, CSA Gen. Mark Milley talked about the fragility of trust:

"We come from the people and we defend the people. That's our purpose. That's the only reason we exist. And we have to maintain the trust of the American people. Right now you have it. We have it. But trust is a fragile thing. And every time somebody breaks the trust, you're chipping away at the trust, the bond, the cohesion, between the people, and the people's Army."

Read more:
STAND-TO! Army Profession Forum
Trust bedrock of Army profession

Five Myths about Military Ethics

Dr. C. Anthony Pfaff, Research Professor for Military Profession and Ethic at the U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute, and Senior Fellow, Center for the Army Profession and Ethic (CAPE), wrote an article in the Autumn 2016 issue of Parameters magazine entitled: "Five Myths about Military Ethics."

The article abstract:

After a decade and a half of struggling across various dimensions, the Army's ethic risks losing traction with its practitioners. With that loss of traction comes a commensurate loss of trust, which will have a negative impact on the relationship the military has with the society it serves, undermining its status as a profession. Addressing these challenges requires getting past the myths that obscure the solutions.

Read the full article: Five Myths about Military Ethics

TRADOC Holds NCO Talent Management Town Hall

Town Hall Moderator and Panelists

U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) hosted its third State of NCO Development town hall at Fort Eustis, Virginia, Nov. 3. The topic was talent management. TRADOC Command Sgt. Maj. Dave Davenport; Command Sgt. Maj. Wardell Jefferson of Human Resources Command; and Sgt. Maj. Derek Johnson, deputy chief of staff G1 sergeant major at Headquarters Department of the Army, were the three panelists taking questions during the event with Master Sgt. Michael Lavigne moderating.

Martha C. Koester wrote an article about the event, entitled "Third TRADOC Town Hall Focuses on Talent Management," in which she says, "Davenport acknowledged that NCOs have had a lot of information thrown at them about NCO 2020, but he said that's why the series of TRADOC town halls were developed. They offer an opportunity for Soldiers to get their questions answered from senior NCOs and to have issues placed into context for them."

Read the full article in NCO Journal: Third TRADOC Town Hall Focuses on Talent Management

Watch the full event on YouTube below:

Snider Dedicates His Life to the Army Profession

Dr. Don M. Snider speaks during the 2014 Army Profession Annual Symposium at West Point, NY.

The Association of the United States Army (AUSA) recently posted an article on their website lauding Dr. Don M. Snider for more than 50 years of government service, including his tireless work and dedication to the recognition of the Army as a profession. A 1962 West Point graduate with three combat tours, the article says that after his retirement from active duty as a colonel, "Snider became a leading scholar pushing the idea that a strong Army requires moral and ethical leaders who see what they are doing as a calling, not just a job."

"Don Snider is an American treasure," said Maj. Gen. William E. Rapp, Army War College commandant, who called Snider "one of my personal heroes and inspirations."

Read the full article, entitled Ethics, Morality and Leadership: Snider Dedicates Life to Army Profession

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One Army, Indivisible

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