Center for the Army Profession and Ethic

Army Logo CAC Shield TRADOC Insignia
RSS Feed Google+ YouTube Channel Twitter Facebook

Not in my Squad (NIMS) Results

Not in my Squad (NIMS)

Evaluate the State of Mutual Trust and Cohesion Within Your Squad

Strengthen your team's commitment to live our shared identity as Trusted Army Professionals.

The Army doctrine of Mission Command is based on building cohesive teams through mutual trust and shared understanding and purpose. The squad is the foundational team upon which the Army builds it formations. As the Squad Leader, you are responsible for all your team does or fails to do. You are charged with taking the lead in training your squad and instilling discipline and a “winning spirit” in each of your Soldiers. This is your Duty. Your Soldiers, as a cohesive team, must accomplish the mission in the right way (ethically, effectively, and efficiently), striving for excellence, and persevering through adversity, challenge, and setback. To do so, they require inspiration, motivation, and committed leadership.

This resource is designed to help you assess the state of mutual trust and cohesion within your squad. It will help you to gain situational understanding. Based on your perceptions, you will be directed to resources that can help you reinforce success, make adjustments to strengthen areas of weakness, and consider alternatives that can remediate areas of concern.

Not in my Squad Workshop Page

If you are unfamiliar with some of the Army Profession and Army Ethic concepts, we invite you to read the definitions from ADRP 1 below.

  • Army Civilian Corps: A community within the Army Profession composed of civilians serving in the Department of the Army.
  • Army Ethic: The evolving set of laws, values, and beliefs, embedded within the Army culture of trust that motivates and guides the conduct of Army professionals bound together in common moral purpose.
  • Army Profession: A unique vocation of experts certified in the ethical design, generation, support, and application of landpower, serving under civilian authority and entrusted to defend the Constitution and the rights and interests of the American people.
  • Army professional: A Soldier or Army Civilian who meets the Army Profession’s certification criteria in character, competence, and commitment.
  • certification: Verification and validation of an Army professional’s character, competence, and commitment to fulfill responsibilities and successfully perform assigned duty with discipline and to standard.
  • character: Dedication and adherence to the Army Ethic, including Army Values, as consistently and faithfully demonstrated in decisions and actions.
  • commitment: Resolve to contribute honorable service to the Nation and accomplish the mission despite adversity, obstacles, and challenges.
  • competence: Demonstrated ability to successfully perform duty with discipline and to standard.
  • esprit de corps: A traditional military expression that denotes the Army’s common spirit, a collective ethos of camaraderie and cohesion within the team.
  • external trust: The confidence and faith that the American people have in the Army to serve the Nation ethically, effectively, and efficiently.
  • honorable service: Support and defense of the Constitution, the American people, and the national interest in a manner consistent with the Army Ethic.
  • internal trust: Reliance on the character, competence, and commitment of Army professionals to live by and uphold the Army Ethic.
  • military expertise: Ethical design, generation, support, and application of landpower, primarily in unified land operations, and all supporting capabilities essential to accomplish the mission in defense of the American people.
  • Profession of Arms: A community within the Army Profession composed of Soldiers of the Regular Army, Army National Guard, and Army Reserve.
  • stewardship: The responsibility of Army professionals to strengthen the Army as a profession and to care for the people and other resources entrusted to them by the American people.

To assess the state of mutual trust and cohesion within your squad, reply to the items below. Based on your perceptions, you will be provided feedback and resources that will help you reinforce success and work on issues that require your leadership to strengthen mutual trust and cohesion within your team.

DISCLAIMER: Your insights, feedback, and recommendations will not be shared with anyone outside the NIMS Assessment Resource Project Team (CAPE/ARI). We are collecting no personal data or other identifying information.

Your participation is voluntary. If you are willing to assist us in this important effort, please accept our thanks and appreciation for your contribution to strengthen the Army Profession.

In my squad we... Strongly Disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Agree Not Applicable
Reset Form

Overall Summary

Below are your results based on the answers you selected above. For more detailed information see the group summary below

Group 1
Developing Mutual Trust in Cohesive Teams
(Our Winning Spirit)

Your average score for this group is 0 out of 0

For this group squad leaders scored 0 out of 0

Group 2
Shared Identity
(Army Professionals)

Your average score for this group is 0 out of 0

For this group squad leaders scored 0 out of 0

Group 3
Who We Are, Why and How We Fight
(Living the Army Ethic)

Your average score for this group is 0 out of 0

For this group squad leaders scored 0 out of 0

Group 4
Standards & Discipline
(Committed Professionals)

Your average score for this group is 0 out of 0

For this group squad leaders scored 0 out of 0

Group 5
Climate
(Steward)

Your average score for this group is 0 out of 0

For this group squad leaders scored 0 out of 0

Group 6
My Soldiers

Your average score for this group is 0 out of 0

For this group squad leaders scored 0 out of 0


Group Summary

Dive into each group to gain a deeper understanding of your results. Each group contains resources that can help you reinforce success, make adjustments to strengthen areas of weakness, or consider alternatives that can remediate areas of concern.

Developing Mutual Trust in Cohesive Teams - (Our Winning Spirit)

Question # Question Text Answer Value

Your average score for this group is 0 out of 0


Squads do not become effective overnight. If you’re dedicated and committed to your Soldiers, and if you’re willing to put yourself on the line for your team, then the reality of the situation is that you’re emotionally invested. You care...

We are bonded together through mutual trust, in cohesive teams—units and organizations—a band of brothers and sisters. Our shared identity, sense of purpose, and winning spirit strengthen our individual and collective commitment, resilience, and courage—a never quit resolve—enabling us to persevere and accomplish even the most arduous mission. Trust is the assured reliance on the character, ability, strength, and truth of someone or something. It is the essence of being an effective professional American Soldier and absolutely essential to being a leader.

Leaders earn the trust of their team when they set the example and demonstrate character, competence, and commitment. Leaders also develop mutual trust through difficult training and shared experiences. Strong bonds of trust built through these collective experiences enable the squad to overcome challenge and adversity. Training and shared experience allow you to earn the trust of Soldiers and for your Soldiers to earn your trust.

To assist you in forming a “Cohesive Team” here is a list of suggested training and reading materials:

Trust Game

Deliberate Pressure

deliberate-pressure

Earned and Given

earned-and-given

Failed Mission

failed-mission

Out of Character

out-of-character

Accountable Justice

accountable-justice

Adherence to Standards

adherence-to-standards

Shared Identity - (Army Professionals)

Question # Question Text Answer Value

Your average score for this group is 0 out of 0


Identity refers to one's self concept. By taking our solemn oath of service, we voluntarily incur an extraordinary moral obligation inherent in the shared identity to which we aspire. How do people identify with organizations? What role does your identity play in your shaping your squad? All professions, major institutions, and large organizations have distinct cultures that influence behaviors and shape the identity of their members.

Our shared professional identity as trusted Army professionals guides our decisions and actions, inspiring us to be honorable servants, Army experts, and responsible stewards of the Army Profession. We are committed to lifelong learning and professional development. We strive for standards of excellence in all our endeavors. We contribute our best effort to accomplish the mission and embrace a spirit of Honorable Service to others before self.

Intrinsically, character is one's true nature including identity, sense of purpose, values, virtues, morals, and conscience. Operationally, a Soldier of character makes decisions and takes actions consistent with the moral principles of the Army Ethic. Our shared identity is strengthened through education, training, and experience. We are committed to lifelong learning and character development, offering and receiving coaching, counseling, and mentoring.

To assist you in shaping and strengthening our "Shared Identity" here is a list of suggested training and reading materials:

An Ethical Pause

an-ethical-pause

Finding a Family

finding-a-family

Confronting Unethical Conduct on Social Media

confronting-unethical-conduct-on-social-media

Who We Are, Why and How We Fight - (Living the Army Ethic)

Question # Question Text Answer Value

Your average score for this group is 0 out of 0


As the Squad Leader you must help your Soldiers recognize circumstances that are likely to cause them to act out of character and to resist situational pressures that might lead to misconduct.

Accordingly, the Army Ethic, with embedded Army Values, is taught and integrated within mission command. However, if leaders allow disconnects between word and deed—between professed values and actual practices—then they breed cynicism, compromise mutual trust, and degrade organizational esprit de corps and individual morale. Conversely, leader actions consistent with the Army Ethic strengthen mutual trust and build cohesive teams, supporting the philosophy of mission command.

Every person in a squad/platoon or company is morally responsible for their own conduct and every effort to strengthen character should focus on the individual and the command climate in the Squad. Specifically in war and peace, we recognize the intrinsic dignity and worth of all people, treating them with respect.

Integrity is a quality you develop by adhering to moral principles. It requires that you do and say nothing that deceives others. As your integrity develops, so does the trust others place in you. Thus, it is essentially how we do things.

To assist you in understanding and motivating "Living the Army Ethic" here is a list of suggested training and reading materials:

Cover of Darkness

cover-of-darkness

Hard Choices

hard-choices

False Positive

false-positive

Life out of Reach

life-out-of-reach

Not in my Army

not-in-my-army

Standards & Discipline - (Committed Professionals)

Question # Question Text Answer Value

Your average score for this group is 0 out of 0


Squad leaders embrace and uphold standards of the profession, always accountable to each team member for your decisions and actions. Perform your duty with discipline, strive for standards of excellence, contribute honorable service, set the example for correct conduct, and accomplish the mission in the right way.

Some may associate discipline only with regulations and the consequences for errors in judgment and conduct. However, it is important to understand that our professional discipline is fundamentally about how we practice our profession. Discipline is a hallmark of the Army and is the expected manner in which we perform our duty, striving for standards of excellence. Discipline and standards are intrinsic within the Army culture of trust.

Discipline expresses what the Army Values require—willingly doing what is right. Discipline guides our manner of performance. We conduct ourselves according to the discipline of our military art and science. With discipline, we choose the harder right over the easier wrong in the face of temptation, obstacles, and adversity. Standards establish acceptable levels of performance and achievement.

To assist you in enhancing "Standards and Discipline" here is a list of suggested training and reading materials:

Color Safe

color-safe

Discipline, Diem

discipline-diem

Climate - (Steward)

Question # Question Text Answer Value

Your average score for this group is 0 out of 0


The most important thing you can do as a leader is to be an effective ROLE MODEL. We lead by example and demonstrate courage by doing what is right despite risk, uncertainty, and fear; we candidly express our professional judgment to subordinates, peers and superiors. Visible to all internally and externally to your squad is a professional command climate of trust, respect, caring and candor. Respect is what allows us to appreciate the value of all people.

Self-respect is a vital part of the Army Value of Respect, which results from knowing you have put forth your best effort. The Army is one team and each of us has something to contribute. The professional climate within your squad is often driven by observed policies and practices, reflecting the leader’s character. A zero-defect mindset, for example, can create conditions in which individuals believe they are not trusted. Unlike culture, that is deeply embedded, climate can be changed quickly, for example, by replacing a toxic leader or correcting dysfunctional practices.

The culture of a people generally reflects what is acceptable and functionally effective. Thus, culture goes beyond mere style. It is essentially how we do things. In contrast to culture, organizational climate refers to its members’ feelings and attitudes as they interact within the team. Climate is often driven by observed policies and practices, reflecting the leader’s character.

To assist you in enhancing "Climate" here is a list of suggested training and reading materials:

Split-Second Decision

split-second-decision

The Honorable Service Sector

the-honorable-service-sector

My Soldiers

Question # Question Text Answer Value

Your average score for this group is 0 out of 0


Battle Buddies and the Battle Within

battle-buddies-and-the-battle-within

My Best Battle Buddy

my-best-battle-buddy

PFC Breland

pfc-breland

Additional Resources

In My Squad Virtual Simulator

In My Squad Cover Art

As Junior Enlisted Soldiers you are dedicated members of the Army Profession. CAPE's In My Squad virtual simulator puts you in realistic situations that will challenge your critical thinking and decision making skills. The goal of this virtual simulator is to help you develop in your Character, Competence, and Commitment as dedicated members of the Army Profession.

Learn More